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Bathroom In England

Bathroom In England

Bathroom In England

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The plague hit England 7 times in 200 years and greatly impacted ****** opinion of bathing, hygiene and cleanliness. In 1546 King Henry VIII shut down ****** bathhouses in England for good, blaming them for sickness. Instead of bathing to keep clean, it was thought that wearing clean linen next to the skin would make the body clean. As a result, laundry and washing became incredibly important (as well as time consuming) for the women in Tudor England. Brilliant white, as seen in portraits of the day, became a status symbol.
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Bathroom In England

England in the Middle Ages favored steam baths and bathing, and many social activities took place in and around the “stews,” or baths. Men and women could bath together (however women may have covered their hair for decency). Dining, grooming and other social activities were common scenes at the stew (as depicted in the image below). Contrary to modern belief, the medieval people in England were quite clean. But like many trends, ****** bathing in England fell out of favor at the end of the 16th century as the bagnios/bagno, or baths became associated with brothels. Another reason ****** bathing was falling out of favor was that the sudden increase in population was making it difficult to find clean water. As waves of disease hit Europe in the Middle Ages (the most famous being the Bubonic Plague otherwise known as the ***** Death in 1347), it was believed that bathing, and exposing the body to water, may contribute to early death.
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Bathroom In England

I’m *******, and agree with Robusto that I’ve never heard the phrase St. John’s. Although I have heard the room in question being referred to euphemistically as “The bathroom”, I believe this to be an Americanism. Unless the bath is actually in there, it’s a toilet, or a “loo” in more polite society. In my house the bath is in the same room as the toilet, so the room is referred to in our house as a bathroom, but one were ****** short in a ****** place I would normally expect one to ask “where is the nearest toilet?” as opposed to “where is the nearest bathroom/washroom/restroom?”, although I’m certain their meaning would be understood. I don’t hear many people refer to it as a lavatory any more, although maybe that’s more a reflection on the company I keep. Certainly though some people refer to it as a “Lavvy”, which is just a reduction of lavatory. I certainly haven’t heard anyone in the south of England refer to it as a washroom or restroom, and I personally would not refer to it as such. Again, perhaps this is an American thing?
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Bathroom In England

The wealthy may have spent lots of time and ***** putting on makeup, dressing in elaborate clothing and using copious amounts of perfume, but bathing for hygienic reasons still wasn’t popular. Medical knowledge of health and disease still was in an infant stage of discovery.  There were some that believed bathing to be the source of disease, and others who believed that bathing could be therapeutic. Some doctors prescribed bathing only in cold ocean water, others prescribed bathing in *** springs. “Taking the waters” was a prescribed activity for the sick and many believed (and still believe) in the powers of ******* mineral springs. In 1742 the Mineral Water Hospital was opened in Bath, England (which was originally used as a bath by the ancient Romans in 60 A.D.) and was used to treat the seriously ill. By 1801 the town of Bath had grown to 40,000, making it one of the largest cities in England.
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Bathroom In England

After World War I and II, the glamour of Hollywood movies and the rise of the middle class demanded certain luxuries in the bathroom. Like the kitchen, the bathroom was becoming a source of pride, especially for the woman of the house. Although hair and makeup vanities still largely remained in the bedroom, the bathroom was the scene for relaxing and taking care of one’s body. The aspirational ********* of the 1950’s, along with the US housing boom, meant en suite bathrooms for the parents and separate bathrooms for the children. There was a demand for color, pattern, tile and beauty in the bathroom. Escapism was another popular use of the bathroom and it represented privacy and retreat.
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Bathroom In England

With a modern sewage system in place, newer homes were constructed with a dedicated toilet, sometimes several toilets. Plumbed water was added and the concept of the bathroom, or water closet, was created. But despite the convenience of a ******* bathroom, behavior didn’t change so quickly, especially in prim and proper Victorian England. For women, large hoop skirts were difficult to pull up when sitting on the toilet, and it was considered far more comfortable (and more discrete) to continue to use the chamber pot in the privacy of the large bedroom. And a lady wouldn’t have wanted to make a noticeable trip to the toilet – this would have been seen as immodest. But despite any ***-fashioned beliefs of privacy, the need for indoor plumbing, particularly for the toilet, was becoming a necessity as cities became more populated and vertical. There was less and less space for ****** facilities and Victorian attitudes demanded sanitary conditions, even for the poor. The toilet, which had taken centuries to accept, had finally become considered a necessity to have, regardless of your status in society.
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Bathroom In England

noun 1 lavatoryDictionary, bathroom, loo (******* , informal) A lavatory is the same as a toilet.She made him flush the pills down the toilet.lavatoryA lavatory is the same as a toilet.a ****** lavatory bathroomA bathroom is a room in a house or ****** building that contains a toilet.She had gone to use the bathroom. loo (******* , informal) bog (slang) I’m reading it on the bog. gents or ****** can (US , Canadian , slang) john (slang , mainly US , Canadian) head(s) (nautical , slang) throne (informal) closet privyA privy is a toilet, especially one that is in a small building outside a house. (obsolete) an outside privy cloakroom (*******) urinal latrine washroom powder roomA powder room is a room for women in a ****** building such as a *****, where they can use the toilet, have a wash, or put on make-up.To the left of the hall was a powder room. ablutions (military , informal) crapper (***** , slang) dunnya cellar or basement (Australian , *** Zealand , ***-fashioned , informal) people who don’t wash their hands after using the dunny water closet khazi (slang) pissoir (******) little boy’s room or little girl’s room (informal) (******) convenience W.C. bogger (Australian , slang) brasco (Australian , slang) 2 bathroomDictionary, washroom, gents or ****** (******* , informal) I ran to the toilet, vomiting.bathroom washroom gents or ****** (******* , informal) privy outhouse latrine powder room water closet pissoir (******) ******’ room little boy’s or little girl’s room W.C. 3 dressingDictionary, bathing, groomingdressing bathing grooming toilette ablutions
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Bathroom In England

1 lavatoryDictionary, bathroom, loo (******* , informal) A lavatory is the same as a toilet.She made him flush the pills down the toilet.lavatoryA lavatory is the same as a toilet.a ****** lavatory bathroomA bathroom is a room in a house or ****** building that contains a toilet.She had gone to use the bathroom. loo (******* , informal) bog (slang) I’m reading it on the bog. gents or ****** can (US , Canadian , slang) john (slang , mainly US , Canadian) head(s) (nautical , slang) throne (informal) closet privyA privy is a toilet, especially one that is in a small building outside a house. (obsolete) an outside privy cloakroom (*******) urinal latrine washroom powder roomA powder room is a room for women in a ****** building such as a *****, where they can use the toilet, have a wash, or put on make-up.To the left of the hall was a powder room. ablutions (military , informal) crapper (***** , slang) dunnya cellar or basement (Australian , *** Zealand , ***-fashioned , informal) people who don’t wash their hands after using the dunny water closet khazi (slang) pissoir (******) little boy’s room or little girl’s room (informal) (******) convenience W.C. bogger (Australian , slang) brasco (Australian , slang)
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Today we see more and more technology entering the bathroom. Sensors for automatically turning on lights, multiple ****** heads with programmable temperatures, stereo equipment and televisions, steam-free mirrors, refrigerated medicine cabinets and in-floor heating have certainly created spaces of ******* luxury and comfort. Bathroom styles of today range from relishing the handcrafted details of ***** styles (claw **** tubs, pedestal sinks) to the ultra modern (rain ****** faucets, infinity edge bathtubs). Visit any bath fixture showroom and you’ll be astounded at the options for our bathrooms today. One of the most welcome features of today’s bathroom are the *** standards for conserving water. As more US cities enter water year-round water restrictions, it’s important that homeowners recognize that bathrooms account for nearly 25% of household water consumption (you can take this interactive quiz to see how much water your home uses). WaterSense labeled toilets, for example, use just over 1 gallon of water per flush whereas toilets installed prior to 1995 use nearly 6 gallons per flush.

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