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Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Spread the ****

Sand Lightly sand the doors on all sides and faces (Image 1). Use a wood sanding block to prevent rounding over the wood edges (Image 2). If your repainting project is just a facelift for the cabinets, you don’t need to sand and paint the inside of the cabinets; mask off the interiors with painters’ tape for a clean finish and sand only the front surfaces and visible edges of the cabinet face frames. When sanding, there is no need to remove all of the *** paint if it is sound and well-adhered; just roughen the surface to provide the *** paint with a firm, clean base for better adhesion. Pay particular attention to especially worn areas of *** finish, which typically get the most use. Also be sure to sand over shiny areas to deglaze any remaining previous finish. Stubborn finishes may require rubbing with denatured alcohol and fine steel wool. If the *** paint is flaking off in places, it indicates the finish did not adhere well to the wood surface. This is typically due to moisture or greasy residue getting under the paint layer or into the wood itself, which can be expected in kitchens. Sand these areas to bare wood and spot-prime with a stain-killing primer/sealer before repainting. Wherever you sand down to bare wood, try to blend or “feather” the edges where the *** paint meets the wood so the *** paint will lay flat, and the paint edges will not be visible or “telegraph” through the *** finish. Thoroughly vacuum the sanding dust from all surfaces (Image 3). If you have a pneumatic air compressor, use high-pressure air to blow the dust out of crevices or molding details. Wipe down the areas to be painted with a tack cloth to ******* any remaining sanding residue (Image 4).
kitchen cabinet repainting 1

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Lightly sand the doors on all sides and faces (Image 1). Use a wood sanding block to prevent rounding over the wood edges (Image 2). If your repainting project is just a facelift for the cabinets, you don’t need to sand and paint the inside of the cabinets; mask off the interiors with painters’ tape for a clean finish and sand only the front surfaces and visible edges of the cabinet face frames. When sanding, there is no need to remove all of the *** paint if it is sound and well-adhered; just roughen the surface to provide the *** paint with a firm, clean base for better adhesion. Pay particular attention to especially worn areas of *** finish, which typically get the most use. Also be sure to sand over shiny areas to deglaze any remaining previous finish. Stubborn finishes may require rubbing with denatured alcohol and fine steel wool. If the *** paint is flaking off in places, it indicates the finish did not adhere well to the wood surface. This is typically due to moisture or greasy residue getting under the paint layer or into the wood itself, which can be expected in kitchens. Sand these areas to bare wood and spot-prime with a stain-killing primer/sealer before repainting. Wherever you sand down to bare wood, try to blend or “feather” the edges where the *** paint meets the wood so the *** paint will lay flat, and the paint edges will not be visible or “telegraph” through the *** finish. Thoroughly vacuum the sanding dust from all surfaces (Image 3). If you have a pneumatic air compressor, use high-pressure air to blow the dust out of crevices or molding details. Wipe down the areas to be painted with a tack cloth to ******* any remaining sanding residue (Image 4).
kitchen cabinet repainting 2

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-sanded-doors_s4x3 Closeup of kitchen cabinet doors after they were sanded. Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-prime-door-03_s4x3 Closeup of roller brush being used to prime the cabinet door. Painting Inside of Cabinets This project can take the better part of a weekend, but if done right, your kitchen will look brand ***, and you’ll add value to your home. Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-second-coat_s4x3 Amy paints the edges of the cabinet door with a second coat of paint.
kitchen cabinet repainting 3

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

The cabinet surface you’re repainting will determine how you approach the ***. If you’re dealing with flat wood, you’re in luck—this is the easiest surface to repaint. Wood laminate and metal are also fairly easy to **** with. Plastic laminate may require special paints and techniques, so if you have this type of surface, consult a professional.
kitchen cabinet repainting 4

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Going from a dark cabinet to light? Consider tinting the primer to match the final color. If your color transition is *******, you might instead add a coat of underbody, such as Fresh Start, a thicker, less transparent primer that hides more (and can also be tinted). You can have the tinting done in the paint store; I request 75 percent of the final color, so it’s lighter but close. (For more on the topic, read Back from *****, Meredith’s repainting chronicle.)
kitchen cabinet repainting 5

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Apply an even coat of primer-sealer to all surfaces to ensure a well-bonded finish coat. Primer-sealers also reduce the need to sand and deglaze *** finishes before repainting. Another advantage to a primer-sealer is that it provides a good base for semigloss, water-based paint. High-gloss enamel paint was once the preferred finish for kitchen cabinets because it resists stains and water and is easily cleaned, but today’s water-based finishes are easier to **** with and provide an equally durable finish.
kitchen cabinet repainting 6

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

Apply Primer-Sealer ***** video of this ****. Apply an even coat of primer-sealer to all surfaces to ensure a well-bonded finish coat. Primer-sealers also reduce the need to sand and deglaze *** finishes before repainting. Another advantage to a primer-sealer is that it provides a good base for semigloss, water-based paint. High-gloss enamel paint was once the preferred finish for kitchen cabinets because it resists stains and water and is easily cleaned, but today’s water-based finishes are easier to **** with and provide an equally durable finish.
kitchen cabinet repainting 7

Kitchen Cabinet Repainting

***** video of this ****. Apply an even coat of primer-sealer to all surfaces to ensure a well-bonded finish coat. Primer-sealers also reduce the need to sand and deglaze *** finishes before repainting. Another advantage to a primer-sealer is that it provides a good base for semigloss, water-based paint. High-gloss enamel paint was once the preferred finish for kitchen cabinets because it resists stains and water and is easily cleaned, but today’s water-based finishes are easier to **** with and provide an equally durable finish.
kitchen cabinet repainting 8

If the *** paint is flaking off in places, it indicates the finish did not adhere well to the wood surface. This is typically due to moisture or greasy residue getting under the paint layer or into the wood itself, which can be expected in kitchens. Sand these areas to bare wood and spot-prime with a stain-killing primer/sealer before repainting. Wherever you sand down to bare wood, try to blend or “feather” the edges where the *** paint meets the wood so the *** paint will lay flat, and the paint edges will not be visible or “telegraph” through the *** finish.
kitchen cabinet repainting 9

Introduction Size-Up the *** Wood, wood-laminate, and metal cabinets usually can be repainted without difficulty. Plastic laminate cabinets resist overpainting — those that can be refinished often require special paints and techniques, and results can vary. If your cabinets have plastic laminate surfaces, ***** check with a knowledgeable paint dealer, and test a sample of the paint you wish to use in an inconspicuous area to ensure that it will bond to the material. Flat-front doors and drawers are easily repainted, but woodwork with raised panels, routed profiles or other architectural detailing will require more time to prep and paint. If the woodwork is warped, badly worn or damaged, or coming apart at the glued joints, you can opt to buy *** unfinished doors and drawers and paint them along with your existing cabinets. Applicator options for repainting include spraying, rolling or brushing with either a ******* or synthetic bristle brush or a foam brush. All have their advantages and disadvantages; choose whichever is most suited to the amount of woodwork to be repainted and your own style of working. The **** applicator also may depend on the type of paint or finish you choose.
kitchen cabinet repainting 10

Size-Up the *** Wood, wood-laminate, and metal cabinets usually can be repainted without difficulty. Plastic laminate cabinets resist overpainting — those that can be refinished often require special paints and techniques, and results can vary. If your cabinets have plastic laminate surfaces, ***** check with a knowledgeable paint dealer, and test a sample of the paint you wish to use in an inconspicuous area to ensure that it will bond to the material. Flat-front doors and drawers are easily repainted, but woodwork with raised panels, routed profiles or other architectural detailing will require more time to prep and paint. If the woodwork is warped, badly worn or damaged, or coming apart at the glued joints, you can opt to buy *** unfinished doors and drawers and paint them along with your existing cabinets. Applicator options for repainting include spraying, rolling or brushing with either a ******* or synthetic bristle brush or a foam brush. All have their advantages and disadvantages; choose whichever is most suited to the amount of woodwork to be repainted and your own style of working. The **** applicator also may depend on the type of paint or finish you choose.

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