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Why Do They Call It Hell’s Kitchen

Why Do They Call It Hell’s Kitchen

Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen

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Mitch OmerFounder and Co-OwnerWhen football star Mitch Omer walked off the field in frustration and gave up his full scholarship at Iowa State to the chagrin of his furious ******, he was understandably told “don’t come home.” Thus he kept going, past Des Moines, past Minneapolis, and way up into the north woods of Ely to forge a *** life. Grabbing the ***** *** offered (and lying about his lack of experience), he started cooking at age 19. Lucky for him, he was good. “But it was just a ***,” he explains, until he met world-renowned chef Jacques Pepin…****** of Julia Child, author of numerous cookbooks, and chef to several ****** Presidents. ******** Jacques in action “lit me on fire,” says Mitch. “That’s when I realized good cooking combines my **** of art and science, and at that point, there was absolutely no stopping me.” Omer then maniacally studied everything about the culinary world he could get his hands on. Fervently working up to 3 jobs at a time, he gained priceless experience under many great chefs near and far, honing his kitchen skills while trying to balance a ***** home life that included three children, two ex *****, irresponsible drug and alcohol use, subsequent punishments, and (finally) a proper diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder…which thankfully explained his manic-obsessive-depressive behavior. In his 40’s and finally on an even keel, Omer sold almost all of his possessions (and his *** **** Cyn’s house, she kindly reminds him), snatched his longtime “partner in crime” Steve Meyer, and opened Hell’s Kitchen in a **** shotgun space one block from the current location in downtown Minneapolis. Sadly, Mitch suddenly passed away in December 2015, but his legacy remains in place, his vision was already written for the next 20 years (yes, really), and his heart still beats in the restaurant that will never (ever) forget his bigger-than-life, tender and amazingly generous heart. Cynthia GerdesFounder and CEO/Co-OwnerBy the time Cynthia Gerdes, a Puerto Rican spitfire, married Mitch Omer in 2001, she already had her hands full as founder and owner of a beloved local chain of indie toy stores called Creative Kidstuff. Having grown her business to $11 million, it was a snap to offer to “help” Mitch start his own restaurant. “How **** can it be?” she thought. So she put together a business plan, found a bank to finance the place, designed the menu, signage, website, ads, press releases and other marketing materials, set up the backend accounting, payroll, front end POS system, legal documents, tax accounts, insurance, city permits, Health Dept compliance, workers comp accounts and on and on and on. (Can you guess by now what happened?) Yes, running the business end of Hell’s Kitchen not only consumed ALL of her time, but she eventually decided to sell the toy stores in order to remain sane while focusing on her CEO “*** from Hell” even more. It took years for most employees to realize her true role in the restaurant because after decades of being in the spotlight with her award-winning, nationally-acclaimed shops, she was more than happy to let the lights shine on her chef partners Mitch and Steve. But she still laughs while explaining, “You know that joke about ‘behind every successful man is a woman?’ Don’t get me wrong…these guys are the core of this restaurant…but my version of that saying is, ‘Behind every successful man is a woman rolling her eyes.’ ” You can reach Cyn easily by sending an email to Cyn@HellsKitchenInc.com Steve MeyerChef and Co-OwnerThe very last thing Steve Meyer wanted was his own business. Happy as hell to have a good cooking career at several great Twin Cities restaurants, Steve often followed Omer’s lead and worked as his Sous Chef from place to place, sometimes staying on as Executive Chef whenever Omer was fired (often). Then came “the call.” “I’m opening my own restaurant and I want you as a partner,” said Omer, thus luring Meyer one more time into unknown waters. “Steve’s the hardest working line *** in the business,” explained Mitch, “and I wouldn’t do my own place without him.” So that’s how Steve Meyer ended up as a partner in Hell’s Kitchen. Side-note: when Steve’s sweet-yet-buttoned-down **** Kim heard that Mitch planned to call the place “Hell’s Kitchen,” she broke down and literally cried. Ah, how time heals all wounds. Kim’s now quite happy as our Business Manager, keeping us all “in line” and helping make sure all of our ducks still march in a row. Kjersti GranbergGeneral ManagerThere once was a quiet ***** host who took so much pride in her ***, she kept growing and was promoted again and again and again to Host Supervisor, then Banquet Manager, then Assistant GM and now runs the whole damn place as our beloved General Manager, handling her *** with grace, wit, calm and a sparkle in her eye ALL WHILE while juggling a pre-**** AND a *** baby! Don’t let that sweet exterior fool you though…KJ is laser focused on the business side of things while at the same time juggling a million personalities, all the while making sure our guests are well taken care of from the moment they walk through the gates of Hell. You can reach KJ via email at Manager@HellsKitchenInc.com
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Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen

Hell's Kitchen is an area boundaried by 34th Street and 59th Street on the south and north respectively and by 8th Avenue and the Hudson River on its east and west sides. Up until the gentrification of the 80's and 90's it was largely an ***** enclave for years. There are any number of stories about the derivation of its name, but two of the most commonly accepted are that once, two ***** cops were ******** a riot in the neighborhood and one said to the other “This place must be Hell.” The other responded, “Hell has a milder climate than this place. This is Hell's Kitchen.” The second ***** has to do with a ****** immigrant named Heil who owned a diner popular with dockworkers some time after the Civil War. The diner was called Heil's Kitchen but through mispronunciation became, through the years, Hell's Kitchen.
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Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen

Steve MeyerChef and Co-OwnerThe very last thing Steve Meyer wanted was his own business. Happy as hell to have a good cooking career at several great Twin Cities restaurants, Steve often followed Omer’s lead and worked as his Sous Chef from place to place, sometimes staying on as Executive Chef whenever Omer was fired (often). Then came “the call.” “I’m opening my own restaurant and I want you as a partner,” said Omer, thus luring Meyer one more time into unknown waters. “Steve’s the hardest working line *** in the business,” explained Mitch, “and I wouldn’t do my own place without him.” So that’s how Steve Meyer ended up as a partner in Hell’s Kitchen. Side-note: when Steve’s sweet-yet-buttoned-down **** Kim heard that Mitch planned to call the place “Hell’s Kitchen,” she broke down and literally cried. Ah, how time heals all wounds. Kim’s now quite happy as our Business Manager, keeping us all “in line” and helping make sure all of our ducks still march in a row.
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Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen

********* Chefs Jacques Pepin blasts Gordon Ramsay’s ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ for humiliating aspiring chefs Published July 20, 2016 Fox News Facebook0 Twitter0 livefyre Email Print ****** chef Jacques Pepin, pictured with Julia Child in 2004, was one of the ***** chefs to appear in his own TV show. ********* chefs today are just as likely to be known for their food as their brash personalities, messy ****** divorces or even spiky, gelled hair. But one of the original culinary small screen scars, Jacques Pepin, comes from a simpler time—and he isn’t happy about the state of modern programming when it comes to cooking. In an essay penned for The Daily Meal, Pepin calls out the *** wave of ‘so-called “*******” shows’ for misrepresenting the industry. These shows, writes Pepin “portray the restaurant kitchen in a chaotic and negative light, and I believe it is a disservice to our trade and to ***** people who want to go into this business. The worst offenders insult and humiliate their crew, cursing and swearing, with every other word a bleeped expletive.” One of his biggest gripes is that in many shows, viewers don’t even get to see a dish actually being prepared, and come away with no knowledge of how to employ proper cooking techniques. “Dishes appear from somewhere, and the tasting is only done by the dictator chef at the end of the show, and only in the context of disagreeing, conflicting, or contesting the taste, with the goal of mortifying his cooks, not helping them,” says the veteran kitchen superstar. “This approach is certainly not conducive to creating good-tasting dishes.” Pepin, who along with Julia Child is considered one of the ***** modern TV chefs, rose to fame in the 1980s with simple stand-and-stir programs that showcased ******* ****** culinary cooking ****** techniques. Pépin co-starred in the PBS series “Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home” withChild in 1999. The show received a Daytime Emmy award in 2001. But the godfather of the ********* chefs appears distraught with the state of cooking media today for promoting “confrontation” and “bitter drama” among food workers. He even calls out Gordon Ramsay’s popular “Hell’s Kitchen” as one of the worst offenders. “The cruel rivalry and conflict depicted in Hell’s Kitchen may be good for ratings, but it is unjust to dedicated cooks and unfair to the trade,” says Pepin, who contends that a sneak peek into the kitchens of Michelin-starred eateries like Chez Panisse or Alinea would show nothing more than well-organized, diligent workers just doing their jobs– without screaming their heads off. Yelling at sub-standard restaurateurs may not get you a Michelin star—but it does get you as much ***** as Beyonce. Still, Pepin isn’t impressed. The chef concludes, “In my opinion, nothing good enough to eat can be concocted under such conditions. I’m going back to my ******’s leek and potato soup and apple galette.”

Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen

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Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen
Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen
Why Do They Call It Hell's Kitchen

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